BEFORE THE MUSIC STARTS

DIRECT YOUR SHOOT

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Shooter 1

Shooter 2

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Shooter 3

After the band has set up, but before you hit RECORD, decide which shooters will get which shots.  Here's an example of how to assign shots.  By assigning shots beforehand, you avoid everyone getting the same shot.

Shooter 1: Wide shots of the band including most members in every shot.  (Move around, get them from different angles but keep the shot fairly wide so you can get everyone)

Shooter 2: Lead singer/musician (stay focused on the lead singer or soloist at the moment, zoom in and out on their face or body part that's playing the instrument, move around to get them from different angles).

Shooter 3: Featured instruments (get close up on instruments, and hands and feet, etc - if there is a guitar solo, you stay on the soloist, if there is a piano solo, you get the keyboardist, hands on keys, etc).  If there are no featured instruments at the moment, just look for interesting instrument shots.

Shooting TIPS

HOLD THE CAMERA STEADY

This is the most important part of shooting video so I'll say it again.  Hold it steady.

  • Hold the camera as if it is a scalding cup of coffee.
  • Move slow, steady, carefully.  Not jerky or fast.  Zoom, pull out, and pan slowly too.  Reeeeeal slow.
  • Hold steady, pan, or zoom on any particular shot for 10+ seconds (don't take quicker shots - they are difficult to use)

WHERE IS YOUR SUBJECT LOOKING?

In most cases, the subject should be looking into the frame.  In other words, adjust your shot so that if the subject is looking
to their right the majority of the frame should be to the right of them.

 

HEADROOM

Avoid too much headroom - the amount of space between the subject’s head and the top of the frame.

 

CLOSEUPS

Try to capture the featured instrument or singer at the moment.  Hold the camera steady at least 10-20 seconds

 

RULE OF THIRDS

Place the points of interest in the shot on the grid lines or at one of the intersections

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